East german sks

Depends on which one article would you like to have translated – the 450 pages Ian refers to is a (! – one wonders what was in previous three…) of the materials from a scientific historical conference held at St Petersburg Museum in 2014, and there are several individual articles, on fortification, uniforms, guns etc. First of all, the 25 MB dowloads forever – it’s now 15 minutes since I started to suck it in, and there’s still at least 25% left to go… When it downloads I’ll have a look and post the contents list. Perhaps one of our Russian posters could make a translation, or we can delineate some kind of a “gang-bang” job (many translators, each translating 4-5 pages) – but it would still take some time. When we’re finished, each translator would send his/her/its part to Ian for integration and posting. I’m not sure though about the copyright: publishing a translated material without some kind of an agreement with the author would infringe his copyright, wouldn’t it?

East German and Albanian SKSs bring a higher price than those of other countries. Soviet and Romanian carbines have largely reached price parity, with Chinese carbines somewhat lower in price. The stock on the Albanian versions being of a slightly different manufacture and being rarer due to low production numbers. There were approximately 18,000 Albanian SKSs manufactured during the late 1960s until 1978, and of those, approximately half were destroyed. Most of the remaining East German SKSs had been sold/transferred to Croatia in the early 1990s.

The weapon has a bolt-action and uses ×57mm ammunition (referred to as 8mm Mauser). It has an effective range of about 800 metres, but when fitted with a high-quality rifle scope, its range increases to 1,000 metres. The K98k has a five-round internal magazine and is loaded from a five-round stripper clip that is inserted into a slot in front of the opened bolt and pushed into the magazine with the thumb. The empty stripper clip is then ejected from the gun when the bolt is pushed forward into position. A trench magazine was also produced that could be attached to the bottom of the internal magazine by removing the floor plate, increasing capacity to 20 rounds, although it still required loading with the clips. Over 14 million of these rifles were produced by various manufacturers. However, this number includes versions of the weapon other than the K98k , such as the Czech vz-24. From 1950 to 1965, Yugoslavia produced a near-carbon copy of the K98k called the Model 1948, which differed only from the German rifle in that it had the shorter bolt-action of the Model 1924 series of Mauser rifles. In addition, in 1943, the Spaniards were manufacturing a slightly modified version, but with a straight bolt handle.

East german sks

east german sks

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